19th Ave New York, NY 95822, USA

Mark

Koolmatrie

indigenous leader

Mark

Koolmatrie

indigenous leader

Mark is of the Ngarrindjeri Tribe which includes, Ramindjeri, Tangani, Yaralde, Meintangk and Warki Country along with other Lakinyeri (clans)

Mark Koolmatrie serves as the Chairperson of the State Aboriginal Heritage Committee of South Australia.

Mark has a Diploma in Indigenous Research at Deakin University, a Diploma of Teaching through Underdale and runs Indigenous-owned business Kool Tours, which provides authentic cultural tours that educate young and old about his country and his people.

Having grown up on and around the Raukkan Community on the south-eastern shore of Lake Alexandrina, Mark’s strong Ngarrindjeri heritage ensures he has a mandate to serve and protect the world around, and in him.

The term Ngartji is a word that describes our totems that are given to us to connect our family, clans, Tribes and the world around us. Our Ngartji is a friend, our protector and our server. We too must serve our Ngartji.

It is to show connection to Country, our identity of belonging and self and the responsibilities we have to each other about our Ngartji.

Ngartji refers to our individual totems which include animals, plants, fish and other marine life, mammals, and birds, as well as how our totems or Ngartjis connect to protect and serve our land, waters and cosmology – the connecting of a complete system to look after our world.

Mark’s family Ngartjis are the wild dog or keli and the fish called mulloway. My Mother’s Ngartji was the seagull or throkeri with my dad being the wattle tree.

A simplified way of looking at the concept of Ngartji is if we all look after and serve the needs of our Ngartji – ensuring they have fresh clean waters, plant life and other microorganisms to survive, food and protection, and their needs for survival are met – then the whole system is taken care of and the whole environment, cosmology and other Ngartji survive and thrive”.

Mr. Koolmatrie’s rich wisdom that reflects belonging and togetherness, safety and security, nurture and nourishment of all life forms is emblematic of Indigenous culture and history. Preserving this with raw authenticity and through mediums typological of such is imperative to future generations engagement carrying this forward in practise, through deep understanding (Miwi-Kungalun) and by listening to our inner guidance.

Mark is of the Ngarrindjeri Tribe which includes, Ramindjeri, Tangani, Yaralde, Meintangk and Warki Country along with other Lakinyeri (clans)

Mark Koolmatrie serves as the Chairperson of the State Aboriginal Heritage Committee of South Australia.

Mark has a Diploma in Indigenous Research at Deakin University, a Diploma of Teaching through Underdale and runs Indigenous-owned business Kool Tours, which provides authentic cultural tours that educate young and old about his country and his people.

Having grown up on and around the Raukkan Community on the south-eastern shore of Lake Alexandrina, Mark’s strong Ngarrindjeri heritage ensures he has a mandate to serve and protect the world around, and in him.

The term Ngartji is a word that describes our totems that are given to us to connect our family, clans, Tribes and the world around us. Our Ngartji is a friend, our protector and our server. We too must serve our Ngartji.

It is to show connection to Country, our identity of belonging and self and the responsibilities we have to each other about our Ngartji.

Ngartji refers to our individual totems which include animals, plants, fish and other marine life, mammals, and birds, as well as how our totems or Ngartjis connect to protect and serve our land, waters and cosmology – the connecting of a complete system to look after our world.

Mark’s family Ngartjis are the wild dog or keli and the fish called mulloway. My Mother’s Ngartji was the seagull or throkeri with my dad being the wattle tree.

A simplified way of looking at the concept of Ngartji is if we all look after and serve the needs of our Ngartji – ensuring they have fresh clean waters, plant life and other microorganisms to survive, food and protection, and their needs for survival are met – then the whole system is taken care of and the whole environment, cosmology and other Ngartji survive and thrive”.

Mr. Koolmatrie’s rich wisdom that reflects belonging and togetherness, safety and security, nurture and nourishment of all life forms is emblematic of Indigenous culture and history. Preserving this with raw authenticity and through mediums typological of such is imperative to future generations engagement carrying this forward in practise, through deep understanding (Miwi-Kungalun) and by listening to our inner guidance.