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Sarah

Ash

photographer

Sarah

Ash

photographer

Sarah Ash is a photographer/videographer and the creative director of Project wild. She also works alongside UK wildlife host and zoologist, Jack Randall, creating engaging wildlife video content for Made in the Wild. With over 15 years experience in photography and video, Sarah captures unique imagery of wildlife in a striking, thought-provoking way.

Project wild came about after Sarah learnt of the plight of pangolins, a critically endangered species that she had never heard of. The thought that pangolins could have become extinct and she hadn’t even known they existed in the first place got her brain- storming ideas of what she could do to help raise awareness of species under threat. After making a plan, getting in touch with FAME (Foundation for Australia’s Most Endangered Species) and securing a grant, Project wild was off and running. Sarah’s imagery has been published in many Australian wildlife and outdoor magazines as well as local newspapers and online. Sarah spent over 4 years working in the video production department at Australia Zoo, spearheading the relaunch of their YouTube channel, producing hundreds of short form videos.

A strong believer in everyone being able to make a difference, no matter how big or small, to the world around them, Sarah has been building a portfolio of striking imagery and is expanding into documentary work. The aim is simple, to raise awareness of wildlife under threat through imagery, create conversations and play a small part in helping to ensure species survival.

Sarah is based on the Sunshine Coast, Queensland where she lives with her daughter, Allira. Currently you’ll find her editing photos and videos in the park or library, sipping liquorice tea, and making exciting plans for Project wild.

Sarah Ash is a photographer/videographer and the creative director of Project wild. She also works alongside UK wildlife host and zoologist, Jack Randall, creating engaging wildlife video content for Made in the Wild. With over 15 years experience in photography and video, Sarah captures unique imagery of wildlife in a striking, thought-provoking way.

Project wild came about after Sarah learnt of the plight of pangolins, a critically endangered species that she had never heard of. The thought that pangolins could have become extinct and she hadn’t even known they existed in the first place got her brain- storming ideas of what she could do to help raise awareness of species under threat. After making a plan, getting in touch with FAME (Foundation for Australia’s Most Endangered Species) and securing a grant, Project wild was off and running. Sarah’s imagery has been published in many Australian wildlife and outdoor magazines as well as local newspapers and online. Sarah spent over 4 years working in the video production department at Australia Zoo, spearheading the relaunch of their YouTube channel, producing hundreds of short form videos.

A strong believer in everyone being able to make a difference, no matter how big or small, to the world around them, Sarah has been building a portfolio of striking imagery and is expanding into documentary work. The aim is simple, to raise awareness of wildlife under threat through imagery, create conversations and play a small part in helping to ensure species survival.

Sarah is based on the Sunshine Coast, Queensland where she lives with her daughter, Allira. Currently you’ll find her editing photos and videos in the park or library, sipping liquorice tea, and making exciting plans for Project wild.

If you don’t know something exists, how are you expected to help save it? Showcasing our natural world through photography and film focuses our attention on threatened wildlife and wild places. Our precious species must be kept ‘in sight and in mind’.

If you don’t know something exists, how are you expected to help save it? Showcasing our natural world through photography and film focuses our attention on threatened wildlife and wild places. Our precious species must be kept ‘in sight and in mind’.